Math

Pre-Algebra


 0.0 Credit

1 Year

Prerequisite(s) ➾ None

Pre-algebra provides one more year of mathematical groundwork for students who need additional preparation before taking Algebra I.  This class covers variables, decimals, number theory, fractions, solving equations, areas, perimeter, volume, ratios, proportions, percents, signed numbers, graphing on the coordinate plane, and factoring.

Skills Taught:

Students will be able to:

  • Solve linear equations

  • Use the order of operations to perform addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and and apply powers to integers

  • Understand ratios and solve proportions

  • Correctly apply formulas to find perimeter, area, and volume

  • Identify parts of Cartesian plane and plot points in each quadrant

  • Simplify rational expressions

  • Identify Greatest Common Factors (G.C.F.) and Lowest Common Factors (L.C.F.) and algebraic expressions


 Algebra I


 1.0 Credit

1 Year

Prerequisite(s) ➾ None

Algebra I is the first step students take into the study of pure mathematics.  The class introduces the principles and steps used in simplifying algebraic expressions, solving algebraic equations and inequalities, and expressing real-world mathematical situations algebraically for the purpose of drawing deeper conclusions.  The course will also cover joint probability and the practical use of statistical measures.

Skills Taught:

Students will be able to:

  • Determine slopes and rates of change

  • Solve and graph linear equations manually and with a graphing utility

  • Calculate and interpret measures of central tendency

  • Make predictions based on probabilities of dependent and independent events

  • Solve simply systems of equations


 Geometry


 1.0 Credit

1 Year

Prerequisite(s) ➾ Algebra I

This course takes an inductive approach to the study of geometry.  The course covers properties and relationships of lines, angles, triangles and other polygons, and circles.  We [the class] will also investigate more advanced area and volume problems, transformations and tessellations, deductive reasons, formal proofs, and some basic trigonometry.

Skills Taught:

Students will be able to:

  • Understand how to use deductive and inductive reasoning

  • Manipulate parameters to minimize or maximize perimeter, area, and volume of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures, under given constraints

  • Apply logic and order to solve problems and generate formal proofs

  • Understand and create transformation and tessellations


 Algebra II


 1.0 Credit

1 Year

Prerequisite(s) ➾ Algebra I

This course extends the concepts of Algebra I, especially algebraic equations and inequalities, in regards to their graphs and transformations of their graphs Matrix operations and their uses, rational exponents, function notation, rational expressions, logarithms, math logic, and a review of basic trigonometry is also covered.

Skills Taught:

Students will be able to:

  • Evaluate real numbers and algebraic expressions containing rational exponents, radicals, and irrational numbers

  • Develop equations to represent linear and quadratic relations

  • Use matrices to solve systems of equations and word problems

  • Identify and graph parent functions and their transformations

  • Use properties of powers, roots, exponents, and logarithms to simplify expressions and solve equations

  • Identify and simplify polynomials and rational expressions, and solve polynomial and rational equations


 Finance


 1.0 Credit

1 Year

Prerequisite(s) ➾ Sophomore status or above

To prepare students for their day-to-day financial life as adults.  This course covers personal finance, as well as regional and global economics; in addition, the course introduces how these topics interact to affect ourselves, our families, and the world around us.

Skills Taught:

Students will be able to:

  • Calculate wages from time-sheets

  • Budget for one’s first independent living experience

  • Balance a checkbook

  • Understand the forms and process required for 1040EZ tax preparation

  • Plan for retirement by understanding investment options, social security, and the value or compounding interest over time

  • Understand the services and functions of financial institutions, such as local banks, insurance companies, mortgage companies, and Fed

  • Understand the concepts and purpose of infrastructure, central banks, monetary systems, and stock exchanges

  • Identify the key philosophies that guide efforts to financially enable developing countries and disadvantaged groups, and common standards used to measure success


 College Algebra


 1.0 Credit

1 Year

Prerequisite(s) ➾ Algebra II and Geometry

This course prepares students who are considering college and are certain that their major will not require a more rigorous Calculus track (*if a Calculus track is later chosen, the delay in preparation can be costly, time-consuming, and frustrating in the long run).  The course expands on the topics covered in Algebra II and introduces students to practical mathematical modeling and financial applications of Algebra.

Skills taught:

Students will be able to:

  • Evaluate and interpret statistical data

  • Find key features of the graphs of function, such as local and absolute maximums, minimums, points of reflections, and asymptotes

  • Understanding the relationship between the graph of a conic section and its equation

  • Generate rational expressions and equations from real-world situations and solve them

  • Generate, evaluate, and compare the effectiveness of mathematical models to simulate real-world situations

  • Express mathematical ideas using live lecture, demonstrations, or technology to teach a new concept to lower-level math course


 Pre-Calculus


 1.0 Credit

1 Year

Prerequisite(s) ➾ Algebra II and Geometry

The course is for all students who plan to attend and keep all options open for a major.  In particular, this course is good for students who are considering careers in architecture, computer sciences, economics, engineering, finance, medicine, physical science, or other disciplines for which the associated college majors require Calculus.

Skills Taught:

Students will be able to:

  • Evaluate, interpret, and simulate statistical data

  • Use binomial and normal distribution to calculate probability

  • Understand and use sequences, series, and combinations

  • Use and understand trigonometric relationships and trigonometric functions to solve numeric and real-world problems

  • Find key features of the graphs of functions, such as local and absolute maximums, minimums, points-of-reflection, and asymptotes

  • Understand and use the polar coordinate system

  • Understand and use conic sections

  • Express mathematical ideas using live lecture, demonstrations, or technology to teach a new concept to lower-level math classes